Logo design for Ramshackle Glam

Jordan Reid of Ramshackle Glam recently redesigned her lifestyle blog and asked me to create the logo. I was super excited about this project because I’ve been a long-time reader of RG. (I credit the success of my butternut squash soup with Ramshackle.)

I did what I love most for this logo: Lettered it by hand. I love the relaxed, earthy, authentic look of a charcoal pencil, and the crispness of a micron pen. (Which also happens to match the style of Jordan’s blog). The tricky thing about working like this means if you “mess up” a line, you have to start over. So I will often use tracing paper to help me redraw the lines that do work, while exploring new options for other parts of the word. Then I scan all the pieces into Photoshop and connect them together.

Here is a close-up of the logo. Every little line counts.

 

And below is a screenshot of the final logo placed into the website. Another designer built and designed the website, so they incorporated my logo into the watercolor and photography background.

 

 

If you remember me talking about Ramshackle Glam before, that’s because I also designed the promotional graphics for Jordan’s new book coming out next Spring (“The New Mom’s Haphazard Guide to (Almost) Having It All”).

 

Goblins, Giblets, and Gelt – New on Etsy

I recently learned that Halloween cards are huge in the greeting card industry. Like, up there with Christmas.

I grew up in an apartment building, so trick-or-treating was a lot of fun. One year I remember a family in the building took a Polaroid photo of us, dressed up in costume at their door. We didn’t get candy, just a photo. I thought that was so cool. I was only a kid, but I already thought a photograph was better than a piece of chocolate.

Presenting: The Naavalé collection for Halloween. Click on the card design to go directly to it’s home on Etsy.

Too Cute To Spook – digital photo card.
Art note: “Too cute to spook” was hand-lettered.

 It’s All About The Candy – digital photo card
Art note: “It’s all about the candy” was hand-lettered.

Another fun holiday fact: This year, 2013, Hanukkah and Thanksgiving are falling on the same night! Yes, that’s right. Double the holiday, double the food. Perhaps double the traffic driving to your in-laws.

But! Thanks to my new design, you only have to send one card: “Dreidels and Drumsticks!”

Click here to find it on Etsy.

Art note: The little icons on this card were hand-illustrated. I don’t use stock art or purchase illustrations for my designs.

 

linda - Wow! Beautiful designs and I did not know halloween cards were so hot… good to know! Thanks for participating in the blog link-up :)

Bat Mitzvah Invitation Design, in progress

I was recently commissioned to design a Bat-Mitzvah invitation for a terrific girl named Julia. I’m excited about this project because the theme of the big event is…BOOKS! As in, READING! How great is that?

The project is still in progress but I thought it would be fun to show you the “behind the scenes”. Most people just see the end product and then ask me, “How did you do that?” There’s never a one-word answer, of course, and it usually takes weeks of work. So here’s a sneak peak into how a new invitation design gets put together.

First I start with sketching. I don’t worry about the details, I just try to get a general feel for the layout of the piece. I then share the sketches with the family to get their feedback. I present a maximum of 4 layout options, sometimes less. If it’s more than four, I find everyone starts to over-analyze and it’s harder to make gut decisions. It’s important to keep the ideas fluid at this point.

Even though the sketches below look simple and quick, there’s a lot of brainstorming that happens before pencil touches paper. Usually I can “see” concepts in my mind, and then when I feel I have some ideas that might work, I sketch them out. Years of art training has taught me this approach. Most of the time, I know the end result will be a combination of the initial sketches. The illustrated details and the medium I choose will bring lots of life and magic to the piece. But that comes later.

In this case, Julia was deciding between sketch 1 and 2. My professional opinion was to go with #1. I could just tell it was going to be a classic, simple, unique design in the end. My plan was to illustrate the pile of books by hand and then paint them in water color or gauche. I knew the colors and texture of the paint would be really beautiful. I was also planning to experiment with hand-lettering her name. That makes a piece even more special and unique.

Julia was happy with my encouragement to go with design #1. So the next step for me was to spend time sketching book illustrations and the font style for her name. I imagined the rest of the text on the invitation would be a serif font, perhaps something like a typewriter or classic book font. It seemed fitting, therefore, to have her name carry most of the flourish.

 

I don’t commit to one style of lettering too soon. I take the pressure off by just drawing, and redrawing the letters, imagining how they will live on the page.

Curvy letters, scripted letters, block letters. Anything’s possible!

I like the look of hand-drawn so I probably will not be vectoring the book illustrations. That technique would mean scanning the drawing, and then “redrawing” it on the computer using digital lines. But in this case, the subtle texture of the pencil and the beauty of real paint feels more appropriate for a “book theme” party. I think the word I’m looking for is, authenticity.

This project is still in progress, so I’ll update you soon on the next steps!

P.S. I recently designed a logo and character design for another Bat-Mitzvah event, which you can check out here.

 

Cartoon posted on Lilla Rogers blog

Lilla Rogers Studio is featuring some of the artists who took her design class this past Summer. Today she posted my work on her facebook page! I developed a collection of cartoons about the experience, and she posted one of the cartoons I drew after a particularly challenging week drawing snails all.day.long. But I embraced it!

Want to see more? Have fun looking at more cartoons I drew about the class.

Oh, and I wasn’t kidding about the snails. I drew LOTS of them.

The end goal was to design a book cover for Hans Christian Andersen’s story, “The Snail and the Rose Tree”. As it turned out, the snail in that story was not so happy a fellow.

 
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